Stories as a vehicle for learning from the experience of others

Senior software engineering positions command higher salaries than junior positions. The industry believes (correctly, I think) that engineers become more effective as they accumulate experience, and that perception is reflected in market salaries.

Learning from direct experience is powerful, but there’s a limit to the rate at which we can learn from our own experiences. Certainly, we learn more from some experiences than others; we joke about “ten years of experience” versus “one year of experience ten times over”, as well as using scars as a metaphor for these sometimes unpleasant but more impactful experiences. But there’s only so many hours in a day, and we may not always be…errr… lucky enough to be exposed to many high-value learning opportunities.

There’s another resource we can draw on besides our own direct experience, and that’s the experiences of peers in our organization. Learning from the experiences of others isn’t as effective as learning directly from our own experience. But, if the organization you work in is large enough, then high-value learning opportunities are probably happening around you all of the time.

Given these opportunities abound, the challenge is: how can we learn effectively from the experiences of others? One way that humans learn from others is through telling stories.

Storytelling enables a third person to experience events by proxy. When we tell a story well, we run a simulation of the events in the mind of the listener. This kind of experience is not as effective as the first-hand kind, but it still leaves an impression on the listener when done well. In addition, storytelling scales very well: we can write down stories, or record them, and then publish these across the organization.

A second challenge is: what stories should we tell? It turns out that incidents make great stories. You’ll often hear engineers tell tales of incidents to each other. We sometimes calling these war stories, horror stories (the term I prefer), or ghost stories.

Once we recognize the opportunity of using incidents as a mechanism for second-hand-experiential-learning-through-storytelling, this shifts our thinking about the role and structure of an incident writeup. We want to tell a story that captures the experiences of the people involved in the incident, so that the readers can imagine what is was like, in the moment, when the alerts were going off and confusion reigned.

When we want to use incidents for second-hand experiential learning, it shifts the focus of an incident investigation away from action items as being the primary outcome and towards the narrative, the story we want tell.

When we hire for senior positions, we don’t ask candidates to submit a list of action items for tasks that could improve our system. We believe the value of their experience lies in them being able to solve novel problems in the future. Similarly, I don’t think we should view incident investigations as being primarily about generating action items. If, instead, we view them as an opportunity to learn collectively from the experiences of individuals, then more of us will get better at solving novel problems in the future.

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