An old lesson about a fish

Back when I was in college [1], I was required to take several English courses. I still remember an English professor handing out an excerpt from the book ABC of Reading by Ezra Pound [2]:

No man is equipped for modern thinking until he has understood the anecdote of Agassiz and the fish:

A post-graduate student equipped with honours and diplomas went to Agassiz to receive the final and finishing touches. The great man offered him a small fish and told him to describe it.

Post-Graduate Student: ‘That’s only a sunfish.’

Agassiz: ‘I know that. Write a description of it.’

After a few minutes the student returned with the description of the Ichthus Heliodiplodokus, or whatever term is used to conceal the common sunfish from vulgar knowledge, family of Heliichtherinkus, etc., as found in textbooks of the subject.

Agassiz again told the student to describe the fish.

The student produced a four-page essay. Agassiz then told him to look at the fish. At the end of three weeks the fish was in an advanced state of decomposition, but the student knew something about it.

I remember my eighteen-year-old self hating this anecdote. It sounded like Agassiz just wasted the graduate student’s time, leaving him with nothing but a rotting fish for his troubles. As an eventual engineering major, I had no interest in the work of analyzing texts that was required in English courses. I thought such analysis was a waste of time.

It would take about two decades for the lesson of this anecdote to sink into my brain. The lesson I eventually took away from it is that there is real value in devoting significant effort to close study of an object. If you want to really understand something, a casual examination just won’t do.

To me, this is the primary message of the learning from incidents in software movement. Doing an incident investigation, like studying the fish, will take time. Completing an investigation may take weeks, even months. Keep in mind, though, that you aren’t really studying an incident at all: you’re studying your system through the lens of an incident. And, even though the organization will have long since moved on, once you’re done, you’ll know something about your system.

[1] Technically it was CEGEP, but nobody outside of Quebec knows what that is.

[2] Pound is likely retelling an anecdote originally told by either Nathaniel Shaler or Samuel Hubbard Scudder, both of whom were students of Agassiz.

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