Lorin Hochstein

Ramblings about software, research and other things

Posts Tagged ‘agile

How open source beat agile

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How does code land in your master branch? Do your team members commit directly to master, or do you merge in pull requests?

In 2008, the repository hosting company known as GitHub was founded. GitHub quickly became the dominant player in the world of open source project hosting. GitHub’s pull request model of contributing to a project became so popular that pull request is now a generic expression.

Two years after GitHub was founded, Jez Humble and David Farley published Continuous Delivery, a book about automated deployment. One of the central ideas of continuous delivery is that all team members should commit directly and frequently to the mainline branch in the version control repository (master in Git, “trunk” in Subversion, Git’s predecessor). According to proponents of continuous delivery, working in long-lived feature branches that are occasionally merged to mainline should be avoided.

Continuous Delivery was an enormously influential book. As an example of its influence, Netflix’s deployment system, Spinnaker, bills itself as a “continuous delivery platform”. And yet, I’ve never worked on a project where the developers committed directly to mainline. The “review and merge pull request” model has dominated my professional career. The problem is that it isn’t clear how to integrate the continuous delivery approach with code review[1]. I’d wager that the majority of developers who support the idea of continuous delivery are also merging feature branches via pull request rather than committing directly to mainline.

While we pay lip service to doing continuous delivery, we’ve made the choice to go the pull request route. What’s going on here?

I think this illustrates a larger tension between the open source way of doing software development and the agile way of doing software development, where we end up speaking the language of agile but adopting the processes of open source. To understand why agile and open source would be in tension with one another, it’s instructive to examine where the agile movement came from.

Agile was born out of the world of software consulting; the substring “consult” has twelve matches on the Authors page of the Agile Manifesto. The kinds of software projects that consultants work on tend to have three properties: they are co-located, synchronous and have a well-defined customer. A good illustration of this is Extreme Programming (XP), the ur-agile process, which requires co-located synchronous development for pair programming, and having a well-defined customer or doing release planning.

By contrast, open source software projects are distributed, asynchronous, and don’t have well-defined customers. It’s natural, then, that open source processes would be different than agile ones. The continuous delivery approach of committing to mainline doesn’t make sense in an open source project, since most contributors don’t have permission to commit to mainline.

Most of the projects I’ve worked on have looked more like the agile context than the open source project, but we still do things the open source way.

When we talk about agile concepts such as continuous delivery, pair programming, and test-driven development, we refer to them as “processes”, but they’re really skills. You can’t just pick up a skill and be proficient immediately.  One way to improve a skill is the apprentice model: to observe how an expert applies that skill in context.

In open source, the entire process is visible, by definition. We can observe how projects do code reviews, integration tests, new feature planning, and so on. In the world where agile came from, we can’t. We have access to books and talks by consultants, but we don’t get to see how they applied their skills to solve specific difficulties they encountered with agile.

Consider Gherkin-based specifications. Gherkin is popular in agile, but it isn’t used in open source projects, because open source projects don’t use specifications. Without being able to observe how experts write Gherkin-based specs, it’s difficult for a novice to assess whether the approach is worth pursuing[2]. The only time I’ve ever seen Gherkin on projects is when I’ve written it myself.

Because open source succeeds in making work visible where agile fails, developers have more opportunities to become better open source developers than agile developers.


  1. Yes, yes, if you do pair programming, then you are doing a kind of continuous code review that is compatible with continuous delivery. But not all teams want to do pair programming, and in that case you still only have a single reviewer.  ↩
  2. The biggest disappointment in the otherwise great book Specification by Example by Gojko Adzic is the lack of examples!  ↩

Written by Lorin

January 21, 2017 at 7:42 pm

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